Live at the Met Series

About Live at the Met

This series includes 10 operas broadcast live in high definition each season from October through May.

For the 2019-20 Live at the Met series, two subscription options are available: a full ten-opera subscription and a flexible eight-opera ticket subscription.  The full subscription provides one ticket to each of the ten operas in the series.  The flexible subscription provides eight tickets that can be used however you want – one at a time to eight different operas, all at once for eight people, or anything in between.

Assistive listening headsets are available for use with all Live at the Met broadcasts.  Simply ask any usher or Opera House staff member.  Headset funding provided by Robert & Marilyn Maytum, the Dunkirk-Fredonia Lions Club, and by a grant from Theatre Development Fund's TAP Plus program in partnership with the New York State Council on the Arts.

You can see a preview of the 2019-20 season in the video below.


 


Manon

Oct 26 2019 - 1:00pm
Live via satellite from NYC's Metropolitan Opera

General Admission $20, $18 (Members), $10 Students, $142 (Live at the Met Flex Subscription)

Jules Massenet's tale of passion and excess, and their consequences stars rising soprano Lisette Oropesa in the effervescent title role of the tragic beauty who longs for the finer things in life.

Tenor Michael Fabiano is her ardent admirer, Chevalier des Grieux, whose desperate love for Manon proves their undoing.  Maurizio Benini conducts Laurent Pelly's enchanting production.

A take on the quintessentially French tale of the beautiful young woman who is incapable of forsaking both love and luxury, Massenet’s Manon features one of the truly unforgettable, irresistible, and archetypal female characters in opera.  While the story is firmly set in class and gender issues of the past, the character of Manon herself is timeless, convincing, and familiar.  The opera has been a success ever since its premiere, championed by a diverse roster of singers who have cherished its dramatic opportunities, exalted style, and ravishing music.

The opera is set in and around Paris, with familiar landmarks such as the church of St. Sulpice forming important reference points in the story. The opera was originally set in the early 18th century, but the Met’s current production places the story in the late 19th century, the so-called “Belle Époque” and the time when the opera was written. 

The opera runs three hours, 52 minutes with two intermissions.

 

Stage on Screen Series Sponsored by Dr. James and Marcia Merrins 


Madama Butterfly

Nov 9 2019 - 1:00pm
Live via satellite from NYC's Metropolitan Opera

General Admission $20, $18 (Members), $10 Students, $142 (Live at the Met Flex Subscription)

Anthony Minghella's vividly cinematic staging of Giacomo Puccini's Madama Butterfly returns to the Met, featuring soprano Hui He in the devastating title role of the doomed geisha. 

Pier Giorgio Morandi conducts one of opera's most beautiful and heartbreaking scores, with a cast that also includes Andrea Care as Pinkerton, Paulo Szot as Sharpless, and mezzo-soprano Elizabeth DeShong as Suzuki.

The opera takes place in the Japanese port city of Nagasaki at the turn of the last century, at a time of expanding American international presence, and when temporary marriages for foreign sailors were not unusual. 

The opera rests squarely on the performer of the title role - a young Japanese geisha who clings to the belief that her arrangement with a visiting American naval officer is a loving and permanent marriage.  It is one of the defining roles in opera.  On stage for most of the time, Cio-Cio-San is the only character that experiences true (and tragic) development.  The singer must convey an astounding array of emotions and characteristics, from ethereal to fleshly to intelligent to dreamy-bordering-on-insane, to resigned in the final scene.

The lyric beauty of Puccini’s score, especially the music for the thoroughly believable lead role, has made Butterfly timeless.

The opera runs three hours, 12 minutes with two intermissions. 

 

Stage on Screen Series Sponsored by Dr. James and Marcia Merrins  


Akhnaten

Nov 23 2019 - 1:00pm
Live via satellite from NYC's Metropolitan Opera

General Admission $20, $18 (Members), $10 Students, $142 (Live at the Met Flex Subscription)

Director Phelim McDermott tackles another one of Philip Glass’ masterpieces, following his now-legendary Met staging of Satyagraha.

Star countertenor Anthony Roth Costanzo is the title pharaoh, the revolutionary ruler who transformed ancient Egypt, with the striking mezzo-soprano J’Nai Bridges in her Met debut as his wife, Nefertiti.

To match the opera’s hypnotic, ritualistic music, McDermott has created an arresting vision that includes a virtuosic company of acrobats and jugglers. Karen Kamensek conducts in her Met debut.

The opera runs three hours, 21 minutes with two intermissions. 

 

Stage on Screen Series Sponsored by Dr. James and Marcia Merrins 


Wozzeck

Jan 11 2020 - 1:00pm
Live via satellite from NYC's Metropolitan Opera

General Admission $20, $18 (Members), $10 Students, $142 (Live at the Met Flex Subscription) 

After wowing audiences with his astounding production of Lulu in 2015, South African artist William Kentridge now focuses his extraordinary visual imagination on Alban Berg’s other operatic masterpiece, set in an apocalyptic pre–World War I environment.

Met Music Director Yannick Nézet-Séguin is on the podium for this important event, with baritone Peter Mattei making his highly anticipated role debut as the title character.

Soprano Elza van den Heever is Wozzeck’s unfaithful mate, and the commanding cast also includes tenor Christopher Ventris as the Drum-Major, bass-baritone Christian Van Horn as the Doctor, and tenor Gerhard Siegel as the Captain.

Among the most visionary and influential composers of the 20th century, Berg (1885–1935) came of age amid an explosion of artistic and intellectual creativity in Vienna. His vocal and instrumental writing merges the revolutionary techniques of Arnold Schoenberg with the grandeur of such late Romantic composers as Gustav Mahler. The libretto is Berg’s own close adaptation of the play Woyzeck by Georg Büchner. 

One of the emblematic achievements of the thriving artistic forces in Germany and Austria during the brief period between world wars, Wozzeck was a sensation and a scandal at its 1925 premiere. Remarkably, it has lost none of its power to fascinate, shock, and engage audiences, and its status as one of the defining musical works of the 20th century has not blunted its vitality.

The opera runs one hour, 32 minutes with no intermission. 

 

Stage on Screen Series Sponsored by Dr. James and Marcia Merrins  


The Gershwins' Porgy and Bess

Feb 1 2020 - 1:00pm
Live via satellite from NYC's Metropolitan Opera

General Admission $20, $18 (Members), $10 Students, $142 (Live at the Met Flex Subscription)  

One of America’s favorite operas returns to the Met for the first time in nearly 30 years.

James Robinson’s stylish production transports audiences to Catfish Row on the Charleston waterfront, vibrant with the music, dancing, emotion, and heartbreak of its inhabitants.

“If you’re going to stage Gershwin’s opera, this is how,” raved the Guardian when the new production premiered in London in 2018.

David Robertson conducts a dynamic cast, featuring the sympathetic duo of Eric Owens and Angel Blue in the title roles and an all-star ensemble that includes Golda Schultz, Latonia Moore, Denyce Graves, Frederick Ballentine, and Alfred Walker.

The opera runs three hours, 15 minutes with one intermission. 

 

Stage on Screen Series Sponsored by Dr. James and Marcia Merrins  


Agrippina

Feb 29 2020 - 1:00pm
Live via satellite from NYC's Metropolitan Opera

General Admission $20, $18 (Members), $10 Students, $142 (Live at the Met Flex Subscription)

George Frideric Handel's tale of intrigue and impropriety in ancient Rome receives its first Met performances, with star mezzo-soprano Joyce DiDonato as the controlling, power-hungry Agrippina and Harry Bicket conducting.

Sir David McVicar's production ingeniously reframes the action of this black comedy about the abuse of power to "the present," where it should loudly resonate.

The all-star cast features mezzo-soprano Kate Lindsey as Agrippina's son and future emperor, Nerone, soprano Brenda Rae as the seductive Poppea, countertenor Iestyn Davies as the ambitious officer Ottone, and bass Matthew Rose as the weary emperor, Claudius.

The opera runs three hours, 45 minutes with one intermission.

 

Stage on Screen Series Sponsored by Dr. James and Marcia Merrins 


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