Live at the Met Series

About Live at the Met

This series includes 10 operas broadcast live in high definition each season from October through May.  It is underwritten with support from Daniel S. Kaufman and Timothy W. Beaver.

For the 2019-20 Live at the Met series, two subscription options are available: a full ten-opera subscription and a flexible eight-opera ticket subscription.  The full subscription provides one ticket to each of the ten operas in the series.  The flexible subscription provides eight tickets that can be used however you want – one at a time to eight different operas, all at once for eight people, or anything in between.

Assistive listening headsets are available for use with all Live at the Met broadcasts.  Simply ask any usher or Opera House staff member.  Headset funding provided by Robert & Marilyn Maytum, the Dunkirk-Fredonia Lions Club, and by a grant from Theatre Development Fund's TAP Plus program in partnership with the New York State Council on the Arts.

You can see a preview of the 2019-20 season in the video below.

 


Agrippina

Feb 29 2020 - 1:00pm
Live via satellite from NYC's Metropolitan Opera

General Admission $20, $18 (Members), $10 Students, $142 (Live at the Met Flex Subscription)

George Frideric Handel's tale of intrigue and impropriety in ancient Rome receives its first Met performances, with star mezzo-soprano Joyce DiDonato as the controlling, power-hungry Agrippina and Harry Bicket conducting.

Sir David McVicar's production ingeniously reframes the action of this black comedy about the abuse of power to "the present," where it should loudly resonate.

The all-star cast features mezzo-soprano Kate Lindsey as Agrippina's son and future emperor, Nerone, soprano Brenda Rae as the seductive Poppea, countertenor Iestyn Davies as the ambitious officer Ottone, and bass Matthew Rose as the weary emperor, Claudius.

The opera runs three hours, 45 minutes with one intermission.

Please be aware that this production of Agrippina, although containing no nudity, includes some suggestive adult content which may not be suitable for young audiences.

 

The Live at the Met Series is underwritten with support from Daniel S. Kaufman and Timothy W. Beaver


Der Fliegende Hollander

Mar 14 2020 - 1:00pm
Live via satellite from NYC's Metropolitan Opera

General Admission $20, $18 (Members), $10 Students, $142 (Live at the Met Flex Subscription)

Evgeny Nikitin is the mysterious seafarer searching for salvation. Director François Girard, whose mesmerizing production of Parsifal recently wowed Mt audiences, returns to stage Wagner's eerie early masterwork. Valery Gergiev conducts.

With sweeping sets by John Macfarlane, Girard’s new production turns the Met stage into a rich, layered tableau reminiscent of a vast oil painting. The gifted German soprano Anja Kampe, in her Met debut, is the devoted Senta, whose selfless love is what the Dutchman seeks, with bass Franz-Josef Selig as her father, Daland, and tenor Sergey Skorokhodov as her deserted former lover, Erik.

Wagner was the controversial creator of music-drama masterpieces that stand at the center of today’s operatic repertory. An artistic revolutionary who reimagined every supposition about theater, Wagner insisted that words and music were equals in his works. This approach led to the idea of the Gesamtkunstwerk, or “total work of art,” combining music, poetry, architecture, painting, and other disciplines, a notion that has had an impact on creative fields far beyond opera. 

The opera runs two hours, 25 minutes with no intermission.

 

The Live at the Met Series is underwritten with support from Daniel S. Kaufman and Timothy W. Beaver


Tosca

Apr 11 2020 - 1:00pm
Live via satellite from NYC's Metropolitan Opera

General Admission $20, $18 (Members), $10 Students, $142 (Live at the Met Flex Subscription)

Soprano Anna Netrebko, whom the New York Times hailed as “magnificent” when she made her role debut as Tosca in 2018, returns, by popular demand, as Puccini’s explosive diva. Tenor Brian Jagde is the idealistic painter Cavaradossi; while baritone Michael Volle completes the opera’s fatal love triangle as the sinister Scarpia. Bertrand de Billy conducts Sir David McVicar’s stunning production.

Puccini’s melodrama about a volatile diva, a sadistic police chief, and an idealistic artist has offended and thrilled audiences for more than a century. Critics, for their part, have often had problems with Tosca’s rather grungy subject matter, the directness and intensity of its score, and the crowd-pleasing dramatic opportunities it provides for its lead roles. But these same aspects have made Tosca one of a handful of iconic works that seem to represent opera in the public imagination. Tosca’s popularity is further secured by a superb and exhilarating dramatic sweep, a driving score of abundant melody and theatrical shrewdness, and a career-defining title role.

The opera runs three hours, with two intermissions. 

 

The Live at the Met Series is underwritten with support from Daniel S. Kaufman and Timothy W. Beaver 


Maria Stuarda

May 9 2020 - 1:00pm
Live via satellite from NYC's Metropolitan Opera

General Admission $20, $18 (Members), $10 Students, $142 (Live at the Met Flex Subscription)

Soprano Diana Damrau, following her triumph as Violetta in last season’s new production of Verdi’s La Traviata, stars as the martyred Mary, Queen of Scots, in Gaetano Donizetti’s bel canto showcase.

Star mezzo-soprano Jamie Barton is her imperious rival Queen Elizabeth I, and the silken-voiced tenor Stephen Costello is the noble Earl of Leicester. Maurizio Benini conducts Sir David McVicar’s handsome production.

A searingly dramatic setting of Friedrich Schiller’s play about Mary, Queen of Scots, and her political and personal rivalry with Queen Elizabeth I of England, Maria Stuarda had a troubled genesis, despite its musical and theatrical brilliance, and only recently achieved a place in the repertory.

The opera takes place in the late 16th century at the court of Queen Elizabeth I in London and at Fotheringhay Castle in central England, Mary’s final place of confinement. At the time of her death in 1587, she had been imprisoned by Elizabeth for more than 18 years.

The opera runs two hours, 29 minutes with one intermission. 

 

The Live at the Met Series is underwritten with support from Daniel S. Kaufman and Timothy W. Beaver 


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