Art & Architecture Series

About the Art & Architecture Series

The Art & Architecture Series is new to the Opera House and is sponsored by Fredonia Place.

Captured exclusively for satellite transmission throughout the world, this ground-breaking series brings the world’s greatest works of art, and their environs, to cinemas nationwide.  Enjoy unprecedented big screen access into the lives of renowned artists, their art, and the fabulous museums and galleries that are not only the custodians of such masterpieces, but works of art in their own right.  See the trailer below for a peek at our 2018-19 series!

Assistive listening headsets are available for use with all Live in HD Series events.  Simply ask any usher or Opera House staff member.  Headset funding provided by Robert & Marilyn Maytum, the Dunkirk-Fredonia Lions Club, and by a grant from Theatre Development Fund's TAP Plus program in partnership with the New York State Council on the Arts.

 

 

 

 

 

Sponsored by Fredonia Place

 

Rembrandt

Apr 18 2019 - 7:00pm

General Admission $15, $10 Students, $116 Live in HD Flex Subscription

Every Rembrandt exhibition is eagerly anticipated; but this major show hosted by London's National Gallery and Amsterdam's Rijksmuseum in 2014, was an event like no other.

Given privileged access to both galleries, Rembrandt documents this landmark exhibition, while interweaving the artist's life story with behind-the-scenes preparation at these world-famous institutions. 

Exploring many of the exhibition's key works, with contributions from specially invited guests including curators and leading art historians, this cinematic production makes a welcome return to the big screen marking the 350th anniversary of Rembrandt's death.

For many, Rembrandt is the greatest artist that ever lived; and this deeply moving production seeks to explore the truth about the man behind the legend. 

The production runs approximately one hour, 30 minutes. 

 

 

 

 

Sponsored by Fredonia Place


Degas: Passion for Perfection

May 16 2019 - 7:00pm

General Admission $15, $10 Students, $116 Live in HD Flex Subscription

Journey from the streets of Paris to the heart of a superb exhibition at the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge, whose extensive collection of Degas' works is the most representative in Britain.

With exclusive access to view rare and diverse works, this cinematic production tells a fascinating story of Degas' pursuit for perfection through both experimentation with new techniques and lessons learned from studying the past masters.

Sometimes frustrated by his own failings, Degas was consumed by obsessive principles and failing eyesight; but his determination to capture everyday life was evident in every mark he made.  Never fully satisfied, many of Degas' drawings and sculptures were kept in private during his lifetime; but now through close examination, they can be seen as some of the most beautifully detailed and expressive works in the modern era.

Using written accounts by friends and commentators, and the narration of letters written by Degas himself, this production reveals a more complex truth behind one of the most influential French artists of the late 19th century and serves as an exploration of the complex workings of Degas' artistic mind. 

The production runs approximately one hour, 25 minutes. 

 

 

 

 

Sponsored by Fredonia Place


Van Gogh & Japan

Jun 20 2019 - 7:00pm

General Admission $15, $10 Students, $116 Live in HD Flex Subscription

"I envy the Japanese" Van Gogh wrote to his brother Theo.  In the exhibition on which this production is based - Van Gogh & Japan at the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam - one can see why. 

Though Vincent Van Gogh never actually visited Japan, it is the country that had the most profound influence on him and his art.  One cannot understand Van Gogh without understanding how Japanese art arrived in Paris in the middle of the 19th century and the profound impact it had on artists like Monet, Degas and, above all, Van Gogh.

Visiting the new galleries of Japanese art in Paris and then creating his own image of Japan - through in-depth research, print collecting and detailed discussions with other artists - Van Gogh's encounter with Japanese art gave his own work a new and exciting direction.

After leaving Paris for the south of France - to what he thought of as near to a kind of Japan as he could find - the productive and yet troubled years that followed must all be seen in the context of Van Gogh bending Japanese influences to his will and defining himself as a modern artist with clear Asian precursors. 

In this overlooked story of Van Gogh's art we see just how important his study of Japan was.

This cinematic production travels not only to France and the Netherlands but also to Japan to further explore the remarkable heritage that so affected Van Gogh and made him the artist we know today. 

The production runs approximately one hour, 25 minutes. 

 

 

 

 

Sponsored by Fredonia Place 


Klimt & Schiele: Eros and Psyche

Jul 18 2019 - 7:00pm

General Admission $15, $10 Students, $116 Live in HD Flex Subscription

1918.  As the roar of the First World War cannons is dying out, in Vienna, the heart of Central Europe, a golden age comes to an end.

It is the time of the Vienna Secession, a magical art movement formed in the late 1890s for art, literature and music, in which new ideas were circulated, Freud discovered the drives of the psyche and women began to claim their independence.  It was a movement that marked a new era outside the confines of academic tradition.

At the heart of Secession were artists Gustav Klimt and his protégé and dear friend Egon Schiele.

Taking place across five stunning exhibitions with never-before-experienced access, Klimt & Schiele: Eros and Psyche recounts this extraordinary moment in art history. 

This cinematic production provides an in-depth examination of images of extraordinary visual power: from the eroticism of Klimt's mosaic-like works, to the anguished and raw work of the young Schiele in his magnetic nudes and contorted figures against the backdrop of nocturnal Vienna, full of masked balls and dreams imbued with sexuality. 

The production runs approximately one hour, 20 minutes. 

 

 

 

 

Sponsored by Fredonia Place 


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